We are where we are Part 2 where we could be.

The District Council should compulsory purchase all land identified through the Housing and Economic Land Availability Assessment (HELAA). By taking control of land, achievement of 15 minute Neighbourhoods could become a reality. Economic viability will likely be more assured and delivery of community needs more likely to be met. Compulsory purchase of land into public hands is far more accountable, it will ensure fairer distribution and accessibility to services and amenities in the public by ensuring housing is built at the right time in the right place so communities are not isolated. By taking control of the land on behalf of communities then the District Council will be able lead effectively and achieve its local planning objectives. Affordability and accountability is assured as any profits will be ploughed back into community gain.

  • Housing built near shops, services and jobs.
  • Ensure accessibility to sustainable quantities of clean drinking water
  • Business centres with on-site economic development offices.
  • Access to Education, Parks and Open Spaces, Play and Sport and Open Countryside on the doorstep.
  • Innovative energy positive design and architecture with development densities reflecting topography on site, two to five storey developments, flats over shops and offices, the higher up the build and the greater the population density the smaller the land footprint, tall and thin, no garages, spaced apart for more open green infrastructure environments at ground level (opportunities for ground source heat pumps. Direct access for cycle/pedestrians to different floor levels and green infrastructure corridors on sloping sites.
  • Housing orientated for greatest solar gain, built on several different levels, roof top gardens, trees, solar panels, solar heating, air source pump heat, create natural habitats in the design and build. Public access to rooftops.
  • Housing close to work cuts commuting time, slashes significant capital and revenue spending on roads and provides opportunity for more enjoyable environments, green corridors, public squares and parklands
  • Hard development balanced equally or tipped towards green infrastructure.
  • Mixed-uses in the built environment might include housing, shops, small manufacturing and green light industry, farm market, food stores, restaurants, offices all below second, third and fourth floor flats connected by walkways with cafe’s and green roof squares on top.
  • Provide jobs so close a car is not needed
  • The undulating altitude of land within BANES is such that advantage can be taken from wind generated power without long cable pylon runs.
  • Ensure every dwelling, business and shop premises to have the ability to be connected to the latest (at that time) communication platform.

Why the contribution is important

To ensure an economically balanced living environment, there must be a fairer and balanced starting point to people’s opportunity in life. In order to be in control of delivering affordable holistic development that meets the needs of the B&NES communities going forward. The  District Council should be the authority pulling the strings. The best way to achieve this is to have control of the land where the developments and opportunities of delivering truly sustainable areas exist.

by Louise on December 21, 2020 at 01:14PM

Current Rating

Average rating: 3.6
Based on: 5 votes

Comments

  • Posted by dianamfrancis December 23, 2020 at 13:33

    I admire the drive and the rationale behind this set of proposals. However, I have some concerns about the aesthetics of it, which are important to health and happiness. I think will be a need for trees and gardens. Living in flats above things like shops or other flats makes sense, but having some private space out of doors does make a huge difference.

    People who are old or who have disabilities will also need ease of access and being lift-dependent can be quite claustrophobic. Others will want to come and go from the locality to see friends and family and some will be needed to work in other places, such as hospitals. Therefore there must at least be public transport coming in and out of each neighbourhood and some parking space for ambulances, taxis or car shares for those with particular needs.

      
  • Posted by dianamfrancis December 23, 2020 at 13:39

    People who are old or who have disabilities will also need ease of access and being lift-dependent can be quite claustrophobic. Others will want to come and go from the locality to see friends and family and some will be needed to work in other places, such as hospitals. Therefore there must at least be public transport coming in and out of each neighbourhood and some parking space for ambulances, taxis or car shares for those with particular needs.

    The biggest question I have is how the ideas in this proposal can be related to existing neighbourhoods.

      
  • Posted by dianamfrancis December 23, 2020 at 13:42

    As you can see, I removed the first paragraph of my original comment in my second. On rereading the proposal I could see that my concern was probably covered in it. Sorry all.
  • Posted by PaulJ January 02, 2021 at 12:39

    Not a bad idea - except that we don't have a District Council. Compulsory Purchase works where it's used for the good, but it's a bureaucratic process. One of the enduring scandals in Bath is the ownership of Thomas Jelly's old King Edward's School in Broad Street, which was bought by the Samuel Smith brewery over a quarter of a century ago and left to go derelict ever since. Attempts by the Council to compulsorily purchase have been frustrated.
    Living close to where you work is attractive, but that's not alway where the jobs are. In Bath, there's a particular problem with its more recent developments - student accommodation being built in the city when the universities are on the outskirts; and housing developments like Mulberry Park and Holburne Park reasonably close to University of Bath providing no student accommodation but built for people who need to go into the city centre to work!
    Much greater vision is needed in planning - at a time when central government is stripping local government of many of its planning powers
  • Posted by DavidOrme January 08, 2021 at 09:57

    Agree strongly with PauJ. Reference to a District Council in Louise's (otherwise engaging) comments sadly muddies her vision of the - critical - delivery mechanism for her ideas.

    And we can't wish away the fact that WECA now exists as a Regional power base - it has, or will claim, many of the competences necessary to "lead effectively and achieve its local planning objectives." BANES is, of course, a paid-up member, but within this new Governance it can't retain the independence of thought enjoyed by any defunct District Council.
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